HOW TO SURVIVE: TOP TIPS

Bear Grylls (NBC)

Be prepared. And if you can't be prepared, be Bear Grylls

Survival Tip 1:

Out in the wild, finding water is of paramount importance. However, taps are not generally found in the wild, therefore you may have to rely on stranger, more disgusting sources of water. Bear has been known to use his own urine as a source of hydration - by peeing into a shirt he can collect the water and use it to cool himself down, as well as rehydrate himself. Mmm.

Survival Tip 2:

If you happen to be stranded on a desert island, pray that you have access to some bamboo. Bamboo is extremely versatile: it’s very buoyant and it does not absorb much water, meaning it takes a lot for it to rot. This means it's perfect for making a raft and attempting to sail your way to safety, or better still, constructing a shelter until your rescuer arrives.

Survival Tip 3:

If the heat doesn’t get you, the snakes, crocodiles, spiders and scorpions probably will. So why not get them first? Snakes are a useful source of protein and, in Northern Australia, aboriginal warriors have developed a trick where they can break a snake’s neck with their mouth. Be careful, though, as the last thing you want is to get bitten in the face.

Survival Tip 4:

If you find yourself in the midst of a sand storm, try not to panic. Your first worry is suffocation, so try and cover your airways with a cotton t-shirt - it may not be perfect, but it could save your life. The biggest particles of sand are at the bottom of the storm with the fine particles blowing at the top - it's the fine stuff that will suffocate you, so try and keep low to the ground. Also, you won’t navigate yourself out of a sandstorm that could last for hours, so hunker down and wait for it to pass. 

Bear Grylls (DCL)

Smile, safe in the knowledge that you'll (probably) stay alive

Survival Tip 5:

One the biggest reasons people die in blizzards is that they push on and try to battle the limitless fury of Mother Nature. Your number one priority when in a blizzard is to protect yourself from the wind and the cold. Cover up any exposed skin as, in freezing high winds, frostbite can get you in minutes. Out in the frozen tundra there may not be any natural shelter, so digging a snow hole - as Bear did with Jesse Tyler Ferguson - can be the difference between life and death.

Survival Tip 6:

The battle in the frozen wastes is to stay warm and dry. Once you get wet, your body starts to lose heat up to 20 times faster!

After taking a lengthy swim in a frozen lake, Bear had to kick into survival mode if he wanted to make it out alive. Jumping out of a frozen river naked and wet and into your clothes is only going to make your clothes wet, so if you don’t have access to a towel - and the odds are that you won’t - rolling around in fine snow will absorb excess water. After you’ve got your clothes back on you’ll want to get a fire started and increase your core temperature as soon as possible.

 

Bear hangs a deer in a tree for later consumption (DCL)

Deer-licious: Bear sorts out some supper

Survival Tip 7:

Found yourself stuck in Norway with nothing to eat? Maybe you should set traps and hunt for deer. Not only can you use their super thick fur and hide for insulation, but a deer is packed with over 100,000 calories - enough to last you two weeks! Moreover, in the cold we need twice as many calories to survive - and for men, that’s 6000 calories! The super-rich deer meat could save your life.

Survival Tip 8:

Need a wetsuit? Try looking for a dead seal. Once, by skinning a dead seal and using its well-insulated hide, Bear crafted himself a wetsuit that allowed him to swim frozen waters and still stay (relatively) warm.

Survival Tip 9:

Fire is the be-all and end-all when it comes to survival. Not only does it help keep you warm, but allows you to purify your water; cook your food; and keep pests and other wild animals away. So whether you use a bow drill, an aluminium pop can and a bar of chocolate, or even a flint and steel, fire is every adventurer’s best friend.

Bear by the fireplace (DCL)

Bear gets fired up